IMAGO/Alexandra Fechete

Passion and Preparation: Covering EURO 2024 with Alexandra Fechete

Discover the journey and meticulous preparation of IMAGO photographer Alexandra Fechete, a dedicated sports photographer, at the Euro 2024 tournament. Discover her story, the power of passion, preparation, and the relentless pursuit of capturing the perfect shot.

Alexandra Fechete
A photo of Alexandra Fechete. Image courtesy of Alexandra Fechete.

“My main goals are always to take good pictures, not lose my sanity, and enjoy the experience.” Alexandra Fechete’s unique perspective on photography makes her work stand out. Born and raised in Romania, Alexandra’s love for both photography and sports naturally merged, leading her to a unique career path. “Loving photography and loving sports made sports photography a no-brainer,” she explains. Her fascination with sports, particularly football and tennis, has been a driving force behind her career. Despite initial struggles, she persevered and covered her first major event, the 2017 Laver Cup tennis tournament in Prague. This breakthrough moment was important for Alexandra: “It gave me the validation that I needed and the belief that maybe I could actually do this.” With each new challenge, her confidence and expertise grew, strengthening her place in sports photography.

Currently traveling between Germany’s cities for Euro 2024, Alexandra reflects on the precise planning and preparation required for such a demanding event: “I have been mentally preparing myself for that, which makes it a bit less stressful. I think the mental preparation to cover four weeks of football shouldn’t be overlooked.” Alexandra’s eye for detail and ability to capture different moments, even if she “doesn’t get the best spot,” make her work unique.

In this interview, Alexandra shares her insights and experiences, offering a glimpse into the world of sports photography at one of the biggest football events. Learn about her strategies, challenges, and the passion that drives her work.

“It’s never too late or too early to get started. If the only thing stopping you from starting early is your gear, remember that you are likely your own worst enemy. Focus on doing what you love in the best way you can, and the rest will follow.” – Alexandra Fechete.

Ferran Torres EURO 2024
IMAGO / Alexandra Fechete | Ferran Torres celebrates after scoring the opening goal for Spain during the EURO 2024 Matchday 3, Group B match against Albania on 24 June 2024 at Düsseldorf Arena in Düsseldorf, Germany.

Alexandra, tell us about yourself and how you started sports photography.

My name is Alexandra Fechete. I am 33 years old and was born and raised in Romania, where I am still living. My love for photography started when I was just a cheeky little girl, getting amused by capturing people I cared about in funny, spontaneous instances. I had always been a little bit timid when it came to interacting with people, so capturing moments rather than creating them turned out to be a natural fit for me.

I would realize later that this aspect of my personality was what drew me to sports photography in the first place because of the joy, the anger, the frustration, the disappointment, the blood, sweat, and tears you’d see on the pitch – they’re all real, all in the “spur of the moment,” and you’re a spectator whose role will be to present these stories to the world. When it comes to sports, football and tennis, have always been my true passions, which is why even my online persona (Game, Set, Goal!) is a mix of the two. With football in particular, my idol growing up was Gigi Buffon -and I was quite a decent goalkeeper myself- or so I think because I would always be the boys’ first-team choice when we’d play football in the schoolyard.

A lot of my childhood memories are tied to football, from buying R9’s (probably fake) Real Madrid jersey, to kicking the ball into my neighbor’s garden, and Romania beating Colombia and England at the 1998 World Cup, only to then stun everybody when all the players showed up with their hair dyed blond against Tunisia.

As for tennis, how lucky we are to have lived and witnessed the Fedal rivalry! While Nadal’s grit and resilience gave him that unique quality of “never count him out even if he’s two sets down and the opponent has match point,” I always had a soft spot for the Swiss maestro Federer, to whom I actually owe my sports photography career to some degree. It took me a while to warm up to Nadal, and I regret realizing perhaps too late that it never had to be a choice between the two to begin with.

So, loving photography and loving sports made sports photography a no-brainer. However, it took me quite a long time to get into it professionally, simply because I didn’t have the means to take it beyond just a hobby. Or so I thought. But more on that later.
I got my first DSLR in 2012, the Nikon D3100 – a camera I still keep in my collection. From that moment onwards, I basically took the camera with me everywhere, whether in a crowd at a film premiere, concert, or tennis match. I spent the larger part of my life trying to take pictures professionally from any place, seat, or standing spot without actually having the media badge privilege.

It’s still hard to refer to myself as a “professional,” because I feel it makes me sound like a stuck-up, when in reality, for me, being a professional doesn’t necessarily mean being better than anyone else, but rather having better opportunities to hone and showcase your skills.

What was your first major event as a sports photographer? Did it help you to shape your career?

It took me five years to get my first semi-professional camera to cover my first major sports event, which was the 2017 Laver Cup tennis tournament in Prague, Czech Republic. That year also happened to be the first edition of it, so the reception to the news was a bit lackluster. People saw it as just a glorified exhibition, while the players wanted it to be taken seriously -it got eventually certified by the ATP. It was basically considered Hopman Cup’s little brother. But I just couldn’t contain my excitement when it was announced that Nadal and Federer would play on the same team -and also be doubles partners nonetheless, accompanied by other top players at the time, like Marin Čilić or Dominic Thiem. I then got in touch with a local tennis media outlet, asking them to endorse me for media accreditation in exchange for extensive photo coverage. The overall lack of interest from the media basically guaranteed my presence there. I ended up being one of the people whose photos were widely shared both on Twitter and Instagram because, as a fan myself, I knew what the people wanted, and I gave people what they wanted. To the point that even Serena Williams liked a photo I took of Roger and Rafa on Instagram during an interview session -which was sadly shared without proper credit by a larger account.

It was a very humbling experience in an excellent environment where the media was being well taken care of; we all drank Moët with the great Rod Laver, who joined us in the media room to wish us luck and thank us for the work we were doing. One moment I also won’t forget was when it was well past midnight, and I was among the people who were still in the workroom sorting through the pictures, only for Roger Federer to walk past us and thank us as well for everything we were doing. You could tell how much the tournament meant for him and how grateful he was that we were doing our job in giving it proper exposure.

And you would think that after this experience, I became a full-time photographer, right? Well, not quite -and the reason for it was a mix of lack of funds and feeling way too self-conscious about my gear. Even if my pictures had gotten a little bit of attention, I was feeling way too overwhelmed seeing my tiny camera with a Tamron 18-270mm lens in a sea of 400mm lenses. I sensed people’s puzzled look as if they were wondering who allowed me to be there- although, looking back at it, it might have just been me thinking I wasn’t good enough to deserve to be there. A tiny camera setup always tends to stick out like a sore thumb, and oftentimes, perhaps unfairly, your level of professionalism gets correlated to the size of your gear.

It wasn’t until the second European Laver Cup edition in 2019 that my ambitions really took off. Having already been to the first edition and knowing that people were now paying attention to the tournament, I had to up the ante, so I ended up renting a Sony α7R IV with a 100-400mm lens and a 16-35mm lens for the event, which cost me an arm and a leg. This led to what still is, to this day, my proudest sports achievement. Roger Federer ended up sharing a number of pictures I took at the tournament and even went as far as using one as his Facebook profile picture for a couple of months.

It was a match-winning celebration jump after getting a crucial win against John Isner – a loss would have meant that Team World would have won the tournament. So my view was of his back, in mid-air, with the faces of his teammates in the background, all hyped up for the win. That was really the turning point for me because it gave me the validation that I needed and the belief that maybe I could actually do this. It’s also how my love for the Sony gear started, as I’m now using Sony cameras as my main gear for my games.

What followed was me starting from the bottom by covering my local football team and sending the pictures to newspapers and media websites. That led to me finally being able to create my UEFA and FIFA media profiles – you needed published work in order to register. From then on, I just started climbing up the sports media ladder, covering several editions of the Europa League, Europa Conference League, Women’s and Men’s Champions League, UEFA Super Cup, Nations League, the FIFA 2022 World Cup, and now the Euro 2024 tournament. I am basically completing football, but the hunger to do more and be better is still present.

“The key is to always follow the action: eyes on the ball, eyes on reactions, eyes on benches. You will sacrifice actually watching the match because, as photographers, we don’t watch, we follow and capture.” – Alexandra Fechete.

Mbappe EURO 2024
IMAGO / Alexandra Fechete | Kylian Mbappe in action during the EURO 2024 Matchday 3, Group D match between France and Poland on 25 June 2024 at BVB Stadion. Dortmund, Germany.

What are some goals you are aiming to achieve in this tournament? Any challenges have you faced until now?

My main goals are always to take good pictures, not lose my sanity, and enjoy the experience. The previous major tournament I covered was the 2022 FIFA World Cup, and it had the advantage of all the matches being played in a single city, which allowed us to sometimes even attend two matches during the group stages. Because we had the media shuttles ready to take us to any stadium we needed to be at. Spoiler: I am also going to attend two matches on the same day at the Euro 2024 because the proximity of the two cities should help me find the time to get to both.

But generally speaking, for the Euro 2024 tournament, the challenge was maximizing the number of games to attend by strategically choosing my “headquarters.” I went with Düsseldorf because it’s less than two hours away by train from half of the venues where matches will be played (Gelsenkirchen, Cologne, Dortmund, Frankfurt), which is a host city as well.

Most of the matches will be played at night, so getting back to my accommodation in the early hours of the morning would have been quite troublesome. Even so, this will definitely happen at least twice -because I couldn’t help myself -with two games in Leipzig starting at 9 PM local time.

I’ll be back in Düsseldorf at around 9 AM the next day, then take another train at 11 AM to go to Stuttgart for a game at 6 PM. So, surviving those two days will probably be the toughest challenge of the group stage. But preparation is key. I knew this was waiting for me, and I knew what I was getting myself into when I chose to attend those matches. I could have taken on fewer matches, but my drive was bigger than my self-preservation instincts. I have been mentally preparing myself for that, which makes it a bit less stressful. I think the mental preparation to cover four weeks of football shouldn’t be overlooked because oftentimes, in our desire to cover as many matches as we possibly can, we forget we are only human and there’s only so much the mind and body can handle. And that, yes, it’s fine to skip a day or two. It’s fine not to attend all the matches. It’s fine not to do everything, everywhere, all at once.

Another challenge was finances -finding the right accommodation for the right money. I looked at hotels and apartments in all the host cities way before my accreditation request was confirmed, and Düsseldorf ended up being the most affordable one as well. I will be staying in Berlin for the very last leg of the tournament -semi-finals and finals- and those days alone almost cost me as much as staying for three weeks in Düsseldorf. The Euro 2024 is very akin to a Tetris game, where you try to fit every little piece in the right spot.

“Prepare for the worst, but be ready to embrace the best when that opportunity arises.” – Alexandra Fechete.

Cristiano Ronaldo euro 2024
IMAGO / Alexandra Fechete | Cristiano Ronaldo shares a moment with a little girl before the EURO 2024 Matchday 2, Group F match between Turkey and Portugal. 22 June 2024 at BVB Stadion Dortmund in Dortmund, Germany.

Can you describe a typical day for you while covering a football tournament?

Half of a typical day involves preparations for the next one: charging all the batteries, emptying out all the memory cards and transferring the images onto SSDs, charging my phone, and charging my laptop; these are all things that will be done on a daily basis, most likely during the train rides back to Düsseldorf. I’ll also be preparing my name shortcuts as much in advance as possible -since I already know all the matches I’ll be attending for the next two weeks- getting my metadata ready for all of them before the tournament even starts, as it’s a process that can be quite time-consuming, and time will be the most valuable currency.

On match days, I tend to arrive early at stadiums so I can set my gear up without rushing, but also to check in what kind of conditions I’ll be shooting, as camera settings quite often depend on stadium lighting.

If there are signs of rain, I make sure to wrap the rain cover around my lenses and cameras. I don’t actually own a laptop rain tent yet, as whenever it rained, I used my phone to transfer the images, but depending on the weather forecast, I might end up getting one for the tournament to be on the safe side.

Taking trains pretty much on a daily basis will mean that I will have to manage my time well and take into account possible traffic congestion or delays, so I will definitely want to arrive at media hubs early every day.

As for what happens during the matches, I take my position, have the laptop ready beside me, then just follow the action with my cameras and mark the images I want to send. I always do my best to either send them off during a break or immediately if it’s something time-sensitive, like a goal. I also tend to stay in the media center post-matches until closing time, just so I can finish sending what’s left to send.

However, for this tournament, I will replace the media center with the train rides and pack my stuff immediately after the games. Despite the hectic nature of football tournaments, the Euro 2024 group stage will be a nice change of pace compared to what I go through every year covering the UEFA finals because there will be no prolonged celebrations after the games and no ceremonies to run to with your cameras. Of course, this will change in the next stages of the tournament, as every win will have more weight to it.

“I think the mental preparation to cover four weeks of football shouldn’t be overlooked because oftentimes, in our desire to cover as many matches as we possibly can, we forget we are only human and there’s only so much the mind and body can handle. And that, yes, it’s fine to skip a day or two. It’s fine not to attend all the matches. It’s fine not to do everything, everywhere, all at once.” – Alexandra Fechete.

Georgia fans euro 2024
IMAGO / Alexandra Fechete | History has been made today as Georgia qualifies for the knockout rounds after defeating Portugal in the EURO 2024 Matchday 3, Group F match. 26 June 2024 at Arena AufSchalke in Gelsenkirchen, Germany.

What kind of equipment do you consider essential for covering a football tournament? What technical tips would you give aspiring sports photographers attending this tournament for the first time?

Remember how I mentioned earlier that I was feeling quite embarrassed with my small camera and lens, which put me off from pursuing this career for a long time? I met photographers whose camera specs were similar to my Nikon D3100, and they would go every year to the Champions League finals. When I asked them how they managed to pull that off, they said they just followed their passion without caring about what other people thought of their gear. I felt like a fool because I allowed my insecurities to stop me in my tracks just because I thought I didn’t have the requirements to be there. Even if you only have a nifty fifty, it’s enough to be lucky to be in a spot where the players will come to celebrate, and you can get the money shot.

But gear matters eventually. Controversially, I was always kind of against the old classic of “it’s not the gear, it’s the photographer” because the reality is a mix of both, especially in sports photography. Yes, as a photographer, you will need skill and vision, but the truth is, at least in my case, that the more I managed to save money and invest in better cameras and lenses, the better my photographies became because the images were finally able to match what I had envisioned in my mind.
The experience you will gain using entry-level cameras and lenses will eventually lead to better things and better gear. So if that’s all you have, just go for it. As for specific equipment, I know the 70-200mm lenses are the go-to recommendations, but I will opt for something a little bit different: the Tamron AF 35-150 mm f/2.0-2.8 Di III VXD lens for Sony Alpha CSC E-mount and Nikon Z-Mount. While it falls a bit short of the 200mm reach -and the difference can be quite noticeable in some situations -you will be getting a lens that is good for team presentations, post-match celebrations, goal celebrations, and various other action shots. It’s the lens I use for my secondary camera, which is the Sony A7III.
My main setup is the Sony A1 with the FE 200–600 mm F5.6–6.3 G OSS lens. While the aperture of 5.6-6.3 sounds quite scary, the good news is that cameras and camera software are so advanced these days that high ISO is no longer something to be frightened of. Lightroom now even has a dedicated mode that does a great job denoising images shot in RAW at high ISO.

I have also recently started using a MacBook Pitchside to send pictures because it has a longer battery life than my regular laptop. Using my older laptop caused me issues once I got to cover matches at stadiums without power plugs, which is why I ultimately switched to MacBooks.

Other than the main gear, I always carry several power banks with me, multiple SD cards, phone and laptop chargers, and all sorts of cables, to the point that I ended up helping fellow photographers on several occasions when they needed to charge something and didn’t have the means. I would rather over-prepare than miss out on something I needed.

Another thing often overlooked is the camera cleaning kit. I don’t know how, but several times, I left my home having everything cleaned up, only to notice during the games (or worse, after!) that I had dust spots in my pictures. It has happened enough times now that a cleaning kit is always somewhere in my bag. Prevention is better than fixing. Games will be demanding on the batteries, so if it’s one of those days when you don’t have time to properly charge them, bring the charger to the game and use a power bank to charge if all the sockets are taken. Speaking of, a multi-USB charger or travel adapter will be very helpful in those instances where you will have to charge more than one thing at once but have limited socket options.

The good news is that major football tournaments usually have dedicated camera services on-site, so if your gear is not the best, you can always try to rent out a camera and lens for the day, if availability allows you to. You might end up shooting games with a 400mm f2.8 that you would perhaps otherwise not be able to afford, so don’t let the gear limit you.

Always make the best out of every situation and work with what you’ve got. Prepare for the worst, but be ready to embrace the best when that opportunity arises. If this is your first major tournament -I’ve said this a million times so far, but I will say it again- your time management is what will make it or break it. And for that, you will want to spend as little time as possible working on your pictures, so your goal will be to shoot with the framing of the picture in mind, with the right white balance, right exposure, right ISO, and right shutter speed. The more the picture will be in-camera, the better your workflow will be.

Take some test pictures before the start of the games, and try to be consistent with the settings so that, for instance, you can apply the same Lightroom preset to all of your pictures without needing to edit the pictures individually. This might be obvious to some, but always make sure your camera has the right date/time set because if you are sending your pictures to agencies, the metadata that has the capture time might completely mess up the visibility of your images if it’s the wrong date/time. If you are switching between time zones, this tiny detail can easily be overlooked.

Don’t be afraid to experiment either. Play it safe, but also get a bit adventurous. Try new angles, both fast and slow shutter speeds, interesting crops and close-ups. If your camera allows you to, add different shutter speed and aperture settings to your camera memory slots, so you can easily change between them depending on what you want to shoot by just turning a dial rather than manually switching them. And while this is not technical advice, feel proud of yourself for having gotten this far. Being at a Euro football tournament is no small feat, and if you are here, it’s because you’ve earned your place.

“If this is your first major tournament -I’ve said this a million times so far, but I will say it again- your time management is what will make it or break it.” – Alexandra Fechete.

How do you handle the pressure of delivering high-quality images under tight deadlines?

To be fair, what stresses me out more is missing my shots, whether it was something or someone in the way, or me being busy sending other pictures RIGHT as a team scores or the camera focus just giving up in that very moment. So, rather than the pressure of the deadlines, for me, it’s the pressure of getting the right shots to begin with. But something I have been learning and practicing is letting it go. You miss THAT shot; then the thought lingers for the rest of the match. It doesn’t just happen to photographers but also to athletes themselves.

You must train yourself and tell yourself to completely move on from a missed shot and focus on the next one. When I wasn’t able to do it, it was visible in the quality of my photos as well. You might not always get the best position, and sometimes, even if you think you might have, players are unpredictable, so you never know which way they’ll go or how they’ll choose to celebrate or from which side the goal will come, if there will be any, to begin with.

The key is to always follow the action: eyes on the ball, eyes on reactions, eyes on benches. You will sacrifice actually watching the match because, as photographers, we don’t watch; we follow and capture. Having to send different images more often than not to multiple clients got me used to working under pressure from early on in my career, and while I wish I could just click a button and send everything off without having to do anything else to them, the payoff of seeing your pictures out there is worth it.

There is genuine pride whenever an article or a media outlet uses my work because it gives me that feeling of accomplishment, of ”Oh yeah, I did that!” And whether people show love to them or not, the dopamine I get after knowing I got a decent shot is incredible. My process is still far from perfect, and I always try to find better ways of improving my workflow and sending images faster, which is something I struggle with, especially after finals, because there is really no break from the final whistle to the trophy-lifting ceremony and the post-match celebrations. I get locked in, though, and almost work on auto-pilot once I get started on the deliveries because I already know in my mind what I will need to add to each picture from the moment I take it.

Are there particular moments or players you focus on for this tournament?

First and foremost, I will be looking out for the underdogs of the competition. Georgia will be at a European Championship for the very first time, so every point they’ll get during the group stages or goal they score will likely be cherished more than any other team would. Same for Slovenia, for whom it will only be their second appearance. Will it finally come home for England, the team with the highest-valued players on its roster? Can Germany redeem themselves after a string of disappointing tournament performances and use the pressure of being hosts to their advantage? Will France be able to forget about the 2022 World Cup final and that shock elimination against Switzerland at the Euro 2020? Can Spain’s young guns propel the team to another European trophy? Will Cristiano Ronaldo lead Portugal again to victory? Will Croatia, the team that somehow always finds a way, finally grant Luka Modrić his wish of winning a trophy with his national team? These are all the stories I will be focusing on.

Not to mention, players for whom this Euro 2024 might be or will be their last, like the legend that is Toni Kross, the above-mentioned Cristiano Ronaldo and Luka Modrić, Pepe, Nacho, Manuel Neuer, or even the likes of Kevin de Bruyne. And who can forget the superstars and the superstars-in-the-making, like Jude Bellingham, Kobbie Mainoo, Warren Zaïre-Emery, Kylian Mbappé, Jamal Musiala, Florian Wirtz, Xavi Simons, Benjamin Šeško, Cole Palmer, Pedri, Lamine Yamal, Kenan Yıldız or Arda Güler? The victorious and the defeated, the younglings and the veterans, the excited and the disappointed fans, the underdogs and the favorites–these will all be the moments I will be hoping to capture.

Would you like to add something?

Sports photography is in equal parts skill, luck, gear, and commitment. Luck might give you your break, the skill will keep you going, the right gear will help you put your skill to good use, and commitment will turn it into a long-term profession. My work is oftentimes based on instincts rather than talent or knowledge. I sometimes find it tough to explain why a shot works or not, or what I had in mind when I took it, or the technicalities of it.

I see myself more as a workhorse who is compensating through the grind for everything else she might be lacking rather than a highly skilled photographer. The fact that when I am not on a pitch, I am still doing photography-related things, whether it’s photographing the stars at the Cannes Film Festival, a Music Festival, New Japan Pro Wrestling show or just the streets of Japan (which got my creative juices flowing) allows me to constantly grow and learn as a photographer, whether it’s from my own work or the works of others I look up to. Jane of all trades, master of none.

It’s never too late or too early to get started. If the only thing stopping you from starting early is your gear, remember that you are likely your own worst enemy. Focus on doing what you love in the best way you can, and the rest will follow.

“My main goals are always to take good pictures, not lose my sanity, and enjoy the experience.” – Alexandra Fechete.

Alexandra Fechete
IMAGO / Alexandra Fechete | Italy squad sings their national anthem before the EURO 2024 Matchday 2, Group B match between Spain and Italy on 20 June 2024 at Arena AufSchalke in Gelsenkirchen, Germany.
Musiala EURO 2024
IMAGO / Alexandra Fechete | Jamal Musiala celebrates with his teammates after scoring during the EURO 2024 Matchday 1 opening match between Germany and Scotland. 14 June 2024 at Munich Football Arena in Munich, Germany.

 Jude Bellingham EURO 2024
IMAGO / Alexandra Fechete | Jude Bellingham in action during the EURO 2024 Matchday 3, Group C match between Serbia and England on 16 June 2024 at Arena AufSchalke in Gelsenkirchen, Germany.

Kai Havertz euro 2024
IMAGO / Alexandra Fechete | Kai Havertz celebrates after scoring during the EURO 2024, opening match between Germany and Scotland on 14 June 2024 at Munich Football Arena in Munich, Germany.

ITALY EURO 2024
IMAGO / Alexandra Fechete | Riccardo Calafiori’s own goal puts Spain in the lead during the EURO 2024 Matchday 2, Group B match between Spain and Italy on 20 June 2024 at Arena AufSchalke in Gelsenkirchen, Germany.

Hungary EURO 2024
IMAGO / Alexandra Fechete | Dominik Szoboszlai celebrates as Hungary scores a crucial goal to keep them in contention for the next stage of the tournament during the EURO 2024 Matchday 3, Group A match between Scotland and Hungary. 23 June 2024 at Stuttgart Arena in Stuttgart, Germany.

Khvicha Kvaratskhelia euro 2024
IMAGO / Alexandra Fechete | Khvicha Kvaratskhelia stuns the Portugal defense with a lightning-fast goal during the EURO 2024 Matchday 3, Group F match between Georgia and Portugal. 26 June 2024 at Arena AufSchalke in Gelsenkirchen, Germany.

Hungary euro 2024
IMAGO / Alexandra Fechete | Dominik Szoboszlai and Peter Gulacsi celebrate as Hungary secures 3 crucial points to remain in contention for the next stage of the tournament, following the EURO 2024 Matchday 3, Group A match between Scotland and Hungary. 23 June 2024 at Stuttgart Arena in Stuttgart, Germany.

Joey Veerman euro 2024
IMAGO / Alexandra Fechete | Joey Veerman prepares to take a corner during the EURO 2024 Matchday 2 Group D match between the Netherlands and France. 21 June 2024 at Red Bull Arena in Leipzig, Germany.

The credit of cover photo: IMAGO / Alexandra Fechete | Cristiano Ronaldo during the EURO 2024 Matchday 3, Group F match between Georgia and Portugal. 26 June 2024 at Arena AufSchalke in Gelsenkirchen, Germany.

See Alexandra Fechete’s photos with IMAGO here.
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